Monday, October 23, 2017
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Here is the rundown of 2017 Padma grant victors. The rundown contains 7 Padma Vibhushan, 7 Padma Bhushan and 75 Padma Shri Awardees. 19 of the awardees are ladies and the rundown likewise incorporates 5 people from the classification of outsiders, NRIs, PIOs and 6 Posthumous awardees.
This year, Sakshi Malik, Virat Kohli were awarded with Padma Shri, while Sharad Pawar, Dr. Murli Manohar Joshi won the Padma Bhusan award

PADMA VIBHUSHAN

Awardee Field
Shri K J Yesudas Art-Music
Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev Others-Spiritualism
Shri Sharad Pawar Public Affairs
Shri Murli Manohar Joshi Public Affairs
Prof. Udipi Ramachandra Rao Science & Engineering
Late Shri Sunder Lal Patwa (Posthumous) Public Affairs
Late Shri PA Sangma (Posthumous) Public Affairs

PADMA BHUSHAN

Awardee Field
Shri Vishwa Mohan Bhatt Art-Music
Prof. (Dr.) Devi Prasad Dwivedi Literature & Education
Shri Tehemton Udwadia Medicine
Shri Ratna Sundar Maharaj Others-Spiritualism
Swami Niranjana Nanda Saraswati Yoga
H.R.H. Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn (Foreigner) Literature & Education
Late Shri Cho Ramaswamy (Posthumous) Literature & Education – Journalism

 

PADMA SHRI

Awardee field
Smt. Basanti Bisht Art-Music
Shri Chemanchery Kunhiraman Nair Art-Dance
Smt. Aruna Mohanty Art-Dance
Smt. Bharathi Vishnuvardhan Art-Cinema
Shri Sadhu Meher Art-Cinema
Shri T K Murthy Art-Music
Shri Laishram Birendrakumar Singh Art-Music
Shri Krishna Ram Chaudhary Art-Music
Smt. Baoa Devi Art-Painting
Shri Tilak Gitai Art-Painting
Dr. Prof. Aekka Yadagiri Rao Art-Sculpture
Shri Jitendra Haripal Art-Music
Shri Kailash Kher Art-Music
Smt. Parassala B Ponnammal

Art-Music

Smt. Sukri Bommagowda Art-Music
Shri Mukund Nayak Art-Music
Shri Purushottam Upadhyay Art-Music
Smt. Anuradha Paudwal Art-Music
Shri Wareppa Naba Nil Art-Theatre
Shri Tripuraneni Hanuman Chowdary Civil Service
Shri T.K. Viswanathan Civil Service
Shri Kanwal Sibal Civil Service
Shri Birkha Bahadur Limboo Muringla Literature & Education
Smt. Eli Ahmed Literature & Education
Dr. Narendra Kohli Literature & Education
Prof. G. Venkatasubbiah Literature & Education
Shri Akkitham Achyuthan Namboothiri Literature & Education
Shri Kashi Nath Pandita Literature & Education
Shri Chamu Krishna Shastry Literature & Education
Shri Harihar Kripalu Tripathi Literature & Education
Shri Michel Danino Literature & Education
Shri Punam Suri Literature & Education
Shri VG Patel Literature & Education
Smt. V Koteswaramma Literature & Education
Shri Balbir Dutt Literature & Education Journalism
Smt. Bhawana Somaaya Literature & Education Journalism
Shri Vishnu Pandya Literature & Education Journalism
Dr. Subroto Das Medicine
Dr. (Smt.) Bhakti Yadav Medicine
Dr. Mohammed Abdul Waheed Medicine
Dr. Madan Madhav Godbole Medicine
Dr. Devendra Dayabhai Patel Medicine
Prof. Harkishan Singh Medicine
Dr. Mukut Minz Medicine Medicine
Shri Arun Kumar Sharma Others-Archaeology
Shri Sanjeev Kapoor Others-Culinary
Smt. Meenakshi Amma Others-Martial Art
Shri Genabhai Dargabhai Patel Others-Agriculture
Shri Chandrakant Pithawa Science & Engineering
Prof. Ajoy Kumar Ray Science & Engineering
Shri Chintakindi Mallesham Science & Engineering
Shri Jitendra Nath Goswami Science & Engineering
Shri Daripalli Ramaiah Social Work
Shri Girish Bhardwaj Social Work
Shri Karimul Hak Social Work
Shri Bipin Ganatra Social Work
Smt. Nivedita Raghunath Bhide Social Work
Shri Appasaheb Dharmadhikari Social Work
Baba Balbir Singh Seechewal Social Work
Shri Virat Kohli Sports-Cricket
Shri Shekar Naik Sports-Cricket
Shri Vikasa Gowda Sports-Discus Throw
Smt. Deepa Malik Sports-Athletics
Shri Mariyappan Thangavelu Sports-Athletics
Smt. Dipa Karmakar Sports-Gymnastics
Shri P R Shreejesh Sports-Hockey
Smt. Sakshi Malik Sports-Wrestling
Shri Mohan Reddy Venkatrama Bodanapu Trade & Industry
Shri Imrat Khan (NRI/PIO) Art-Music
Shri Anant Agarwal (NRI/PIO) Literature & Education
Shri H.R. Shah (NRI/PIO) Literature & EducationJournalism
Late (Smt.) Suniti Solomon (Posthumous) Medicine
Shri Asoke Kumar Bhattacharyya (Posthumous) Others-Archaeology
Dr. Mapuskar (Posthumous) Social Work
Smt. Anuradha Koirala (Foreigner) Social Work

“Holi” is a festival of colors and joy. Many colors red, green, blue, yellow…but what about them who can feel the joy but can not see the colors. What will be your answer when someone ask you “Rang kintne rang ke hote hai”.

In this very touching and emotional holi video, feel the joy of Indian festival, a hostel life and a message which will make you compelled to think about “Eye Donation”. Please donate your eyes today to Eye bank association of India so that a blind person can see the beauty of this world after you and can find his answer for “Hara rang kaisa hota hai”.

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World’s richest woman Gina Rinehart is enduring a media firestorm over an article in which she takes the “jealous” middle class to task for “drinking, or smoking and socializing” rather than working to earn their own fortune.

What if she has a point?

Steve Siebold, author of “How Rich People Think,” spent nearly three decades interviewing millionaires around the world to find out what separates them from everyone else. It had little to do with money itself, he told Business Insider. It was about their mentality. “[The middle class] tells people to be happy with what they have,” he said. “And on the whole, most people are steeped in fear when it comes to money.”

Average people think MONEY is the root of all evil. Rich people believe POVERTY is the root of all evil.

“The average person has been brainwashed to believe rich people are lucky or dishonest,” Siebold writes. That’s why there’s a certain shame that comes along with “getting rich” in lower-income communities. “The world class knows that while having money doesn’t guarantee happiness, it does make your life easier and more enjoyable.”

Average people think selfishness is a vice. Rich people think selfishness is a virtue.

“The rich go out there and try to make themselves happy. They don’t try to pretend to save the world,” Siebold told Business Insider. The problem is that middle class people see that as a negative––and it’s keeping them poor, he writes. “If you’re not taking care of you, you’re not in a position to help anyone else. You can’t give what you don’t have.”

Average people have a lottery mentality. Rich people have an action mentality.

“While the masses are waiting to pick the right numbers and praying for prosperity, the great ones are solving problems,” Siebold writes. “The hero [middle class people] are waiting for may be God, government, their boss or their spouse. It’s the average person’s level of thinking that breeds this approach to life and living while the clock keeps ticking away.”

Average people think the road to riches is paved with formal education. Rich people believe in acquiring specific knowledge.

“Many world-class performers have little formal education, and have amassed their wealth through the acquisition and subsequent sale of specific knowledge,” he writes. “Meanwhile, the masses are convinced that master’s degrees and doctorates are the way to wealth, mostly because they are trapped in the linear line of thought that holds them back from higher levels of consciousness…The wealthy aren’t interested in the means, only the end.”

Average people long for the good old days. Rich people dream of the future.

“Self-made millionaires get rich because they’re willing to bet on themselves and project their dreams, goals and ideas into an unknown future,” Siebold writes. “People who believe their best days are behind them rarely get rich, and often struggle with unhappiness and depression.”

Average people see money through the eyes of emotion. Rich people think about money logically.

“An ordinarily smart, well-educated and otherwise successful person can be instantly transformed into a fear-based, scarcity driven thinker whose greatest financial aspiration is to retire comfortably,” he writes. “The world class sees money for what it is and what it’s not, through the eyes of logic. The great ones know money is a critical tool that presents options and opportunities.”

Average people earn money doing things they don’t love. Rich people follow their passion.

“To the average person, it looks like the rich are working all the time,” Siebold says. “But one of the smartest strategies of the world class is doing what they love and finding a way to get paid for it.”On the other hand, middle class take jobs they don’t enjoy “because they need the money and they’ve been trained in school and conditioned by society to live in a linear thinking world that equates earning money with physical or mental effort.”

Average people set low expectations so they’re never disappointed. Rich people are up for the challenge.

“Psychologists and other mental health experts often advise people to set low expectations for their life to ensure they are not disappointed,” Siebold writes. “No one would ever strike it rich and live their dreams without huge expectations.”

Average people believe you have to DO something to get rich. Rich people believe you have to BE something to get rich.

“That’s why people like Donald Trump go from millionaire to nine billion dollars in debt and come back richer than ever,” he writes. “While the masses are fixated on the doing and the immediate results of their actions, the great ones are learning and growing from every experience, whether it’s a success or a failure, knowing their true reward is becoming a human success machine that eventually produces outstanding results.”

Average people believe you need money to make money. Rich people use other people’s money.

Linear thought might tell people to make money in order to earn more, but Siebold says the rich aren’t afraid to fund their future from other people’s pockets.

“Rich people know not being solvent enough to personally afford something is not relevant. The real question is, ‘Is this worth buying, investing in, or pursuing?’” he writes.

Average people believe the markets are driven by logic and strategy. Rich people know they’re driven by emotion and greed.

Investing successfully in the stock market isn’t just about a fancy math formula. “The rich know that the primary emotions that drive financial markets are fear and greed, and they factor this into all trades and trends they observe,” Siebold writes. “This knowledge of human nature and its overlapping impact on trading give them strategic advantage in building greater wealth through leverage.”

Average people live beyond their means. Rich people live below theirs.

“Here’s how to live below your means and tap into the secret wealthy people have used for centuries: Get rich so you can afford to,” he writes. “The rich live below their means, not because they’re so savvy, but because they make so much money that they can afford to live like royalty while still having a king’s ransom socked away for the future.”

Average people teach their children how to survive. Rich people teach their kids to get rich.

Rich parents teach their kids from an early age about the world of “haves” and “have-nots,” Siebold says. Even he admits many people have argued that he’s supporting the idea of elitism. He disagrees. “[People] say parents are teaching their kids to look down on the masses because they’re poor. This isn’t true,” he writes. “What they’re teaching their kids is to see the world through the eyes of objective reality––the way society really is.” If children understand wealth early on, they’ll be more likely to strive for it later in life.

Average people let money stress them out. Rich people find peace of mind in wealth.

The reason wealthy people earn more wealth is that they’re not afraid to admit that money can solve most problems, Siebold says. “[The middle class] sees money as a never-ending necessary evil that must be endured as part of life. The world class sees money as the great liberator, and with enough of it, they are able to purchase financial peace of mind.”

Average people would rather be entertained than educated. Rich people would rather be educated than entertained.

While the rich don’t put much stock in furthering wealth through formal education, they appreciate the power of learning long after college is over, Siebold says. “Walk into a wealthy person’s home and one of the first things you’ll see is an extensive library of books they’ve used to educate themselves on how to become more successful,” he writes. “The middle class reads novels, tabloids and entertainment magazines.”

Average people think rich people are snobs. Rich people just want to surround themselves with like-minded people.

The negative money mentality poisoning the middle class is what keeps the rich hanging out with the rich, he says. “[Rich people] can’t afford the messages of doom and gloom,” he writes. “This is often misinterpreted by the masses as snobbery. Labeling the world class as snobs is another way the middle class finds to feel better bout themselves and their chosen path of mediocrity.”

Average people focus on saving. Rich people focus on earning.

Siebold theorizes that the wealthy focus on what they’ll gain by taking risks, rather than how to save what they have. “The masses are so focused on clipping coupons and living frugally they miss major opportunities,” he writes. “Even in the midst of a cash flow crisis, the rich reject the nickle and dime thinking of the masses. They are the masters of focusing their mental energy where it belongs: on the big money.”

Average people play it safe with money. Rich people know when to take risks.

“Leverage is the watchword of the rich,” Siebold writes. “Every investor loses money on occasion, but the world class knows no matter what happens, they will aways be able to earn more.”

Average people love to be comfortable. Rich people find comfort in uncertainty.

For the most part, it takes guts to take the risks necessary to make it as a millionaire––a challenge most middle class thinkers aren’t comfortable living with. “Physical, psychological, and emotional comfort is the primary goal of the middle class mindset,” Siebold writes. World class thinkers learn early on that becoming a millionaire isn’t easy and the need for comfort can be devastating. They learn to be comfortable while operating in a state of ongoing uncertainty.”

Average people never make the connection between money and health. Rich people know money can save your life.

While the middle class squabbles over the virtues of Obamacare and their company’s health plan, the super wealthy are enrolled in a super elite “boutique medical care” association, Siebold says. “They pay a substantial yearly membership fee that guarantees them 24-hour access to a private physician who only serves a small group of members,” he writes. “Some wealthy neighborhoods have implemented this strategy and even require the physician to live in the neighborhood.”

Average people believe they must choose between a great family and being rich. Rich people know you can have it all.

The idea the wealth must come at the expense of family time is nothing but a “cop-out”, Siebold says. “The masses have been brainwashed to believe it’s an either/or equation,” he writes. “The rich know you can have anything you want if you approach the challenge with a mindset rooted in love and abundance.”

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This is one of the SADDEST stories ever told in Hollywood. His name is Sylvestar Stallone. One of the BIGGEST and Most famous American Movie superstars. Back inthe day,Stallone was a
struggling actor in every definition. At some point,he got so broke that he stole his wife’s jewellery and sold it. Things got so bad that he even ended up homeless. Yes,he slept at the New York bus station for 3 days. Unable to pay rent or afford food. His lowest point came when he tried to sell his dog at the liquor store to any
stranger. He didnt have money to feed the dog anymore. He sold it at $25 only. He says he walked away crying.

Two weeks later,he saw a boxing match between Mohammed Ali and Chuck Wepner and that match gave him the inspiration to write the script for the famous movie,ROCKY. He wrote the
script for 20 hours! He tried to sell it and got an offer for $125,000 for the script. But he had just ONE REQUEST. He wanted to STAR in
the movie. He wanted to be the MAIN ACTOR. Rocky himself. But the studio said NO. They wanted a REAL STAR.

They said he “Looked funny and talked funny”. He left with his script. Afew weeks later,the studio offered him $250,000 for the script. He refused. They even offered $350,000. He still refused. They wanted his movie. But NOT him. He said NO. He had to be
IN THAT MOVIE.

After a while,the studio agreed,gave him $35,000 for the script and let him star in it! The rest is history! The movie won Best Picture,Best Directing and Best Film Editing at the prestigious
Oscar Awards. He was even nominated for BEST ACTOR! The Movie ROCKY was even inducted into the American National Film Registry as one of the greatest movies ever!

And do You know the first thing he bought with the $35,000? THE DOG HE SOLD. Yes,Stallone LOVED HIS DOG SO MUCH that he stood at the liquor store for 3 days waiting for the man he sold
his dog to. And on the 3rd day,he saw the man coming with the dog. Stallone explained why he sold the dog and begged for the dog back. The man refused. Stallone offered him $100. The
man refused. He offered him $500. And the guy refused. Yes,he refused even $1000. And,Believe it or Not,Stallone had to pay $15,000 for the same,same dog he sold at $25 only! And he
finally got his dog back!

And today,the same Stallone who slept in the streets and sold his dog JUST BECAUSE he couldnt even feed it anymore,is one of the GREATEST Movie Stars who ever walked the Earth!

Being broke is BAD. Really BAD. Have You ever had a dream? A wonderful dream? But You are too broke to implement it? Too tiny to do it? Too small to accomplish it? Damn! I’ve been there too many times!

Life is tough. Opportunities will pass you by,just because you are a
NOBODY. People will want your products but NOT YOU. Its a tough
world. If you aint already famous,or rich or “connected”,You will find it rough.
Doors will be shut on You. People will steal your glory and crash your hopes.You will push and push. And yet NOTHING WILL HAPPEN.

And then your hopes will be crashed.You will be broke. Damn broke. You will do odd jobs for survival. You will be unable to feed yourself. And Yes,you may end up sleeping in the streets.
It happens. Yes,it does.

BUT NEVER LET THEM CRUSH THAT DREAM. Whatever happens to
You,Keep Dreaming. Even when they crush your hopes,Keep Dreaming. Even when they turn you away,Keep Dreaming.
Even when they shut you down,Keep Dreaming.

NO ONE KNOWS WHAT YOU ARE CAPABLE OF EXCEPT YOURSELF! People will judge You by HOW you look. And by WHAT You have.
But please,Fight on! Fight for Your place in history. Fight for your glory. NEVER EVER GIVE UP!

Even if it means selling all your clothes and sleeping with the dogs,ITS OKAY! But AS LONG AS YOU ARE STILL ALIVE,Your STORY IS NOT OVER. TRUST ME.

Keep Up the Fight. Keep your dreams and hope alive. Go gerrit.

Like and share if inspired. Lovely day

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“Never leave that til tomorrow which you can do today,” said Benjamin Franklin.

Pretty good advice, especially considering it comes from a guy who was an absolute whiz at productivity (Franklin was somehow an author, printer, politician, postmaster, scientist, inventor, civic activist, statesman,and diplomat).

Recognizing the wisdom in the aphorism, however, won’t stop most of us from putting off the “no-more-delaying-ever” regiment until tomorrow. (Which isn’t always so terrible: We’re not robots, after all, and leaving a project unfinished so we can hit the beach every once and awhile keeps us human.)

But for some of us, procrastination isn’t an occasional kind of thing. Instead, it locks us in a vise grip and comes to define the way we approach everything. If you’re like me, you know the exhausting ritual well: voluntarily delay a necessary task until the panic about meeting a deadline finally outweighs inaction. Not only can it send you into an unhealthy and crippling shame-spiral, it’s also one giant productivity killer.

Why are some of us more susceptible than others? Like most personality traits, a recent studypublished in Psychological Science finds, it has a lot to do with our genes.

Researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder surveyed 181 pairs of identical twins and 166 pairs of fraternal twins about their work habits. Compared to fraternal twin pairs, identical twins reported stronger behavioral similarities regarding their ability to set and meet goals as well as their tendency to act impulsively. Based on this, the researchers concluded that procrastination is, at least in part, heritable and has a strong genetic overlap with impulsivity.

Impulsivity probably had an evolutionary advantage, Daniel Gustavson, the study’s lead author, says. For our ancestors – struggling to survive in a dangerous world, fast and decisive decision making was more important than long-term planning. Procrastination either evolved at the same time as impulsivity, or “evolved as a byproduct of it,” he says (when we’re impulsive, we become distracted from — and thereby put off — long-term goals). Unfortunately, circa now, where both goal management and the ability to delay gratification is rewarded, these two intertwined genetic traits hurt rather than harm.

But before you start blaming your penchant for leaving everything to the last minute on mom and dad, remember: most of our personality traits are, at least in part, heritable. The last thing the Gustavson wants is for people to read about his study and conclude: Welp, guess that means I’ll never change. “When people see big genetic influences on a trait, they often think they can’t do anything about it,” he says. “And that’s not true. Just because something is heritable doesn’t mean it can’t be changed.”

Tim Pychyl, a psychology professor at Carleton University in Ontario, Canada, and the author ofSolving the Procrastination Puzzle, agrees.

The way he sees it, our limbic system (the ancient, reptilian part of our brain which just wants to feel good now) is in constant battle with the prefrontal cortex (a section that developed later in our evolution, responsible for executive functions and impulse control). Inevitably, the limbic system sometimes wins out. “It’s human nature to procrastinate,” he says. “You have to realize that you’ll screw up sometimes but you can change if you really want to.”

For all of us wrestling with genes that scream, “delay, delay, delay,” Pychyl shares a few strategies to help the prefrontal cortex emerge victorious.

Understand the true definition of procrastination.

This is super important. There are many forms of delay that are beneficial – life, of course, is a constant succession of tradeoffs. Often, you need to hold off on a project because something more pressing has come up. That’s not called procrastination, though. That’s called making an informed decision.

Procrastination on the other hand, says Pychyl, is never positive. “Anyone who thinks it has an upside is messing with the definition.”

Some of us may develop a warped, protective relationship with our tendency to procrastinate (see tip No. 2), but while there are many reasons why we do it, “none of them are healthy,” Pychyl says. “There’s no virtue in it.”

Stop making excuses.

This is closely related to Pychyl’s previous point. Procrastination is a voluntary delay of a beneficial intended act, and therefore causes uncomfortable dissonance, which we attempt to ease with a string of excuses.

The most common? I work better under pressure. “That’s nonsense!” Pychyl says.
“Everyone makes more mistakes under pressure – that’s been shown again and again. What you’re really saying is ‘the only thing that can motivate me to work is a huge amount of time pressure’…and there’s certain pathos in that.”

While procrastination can cause individuals to hyper focus, it’s simply because their backs are against the wall. The same amount of attention to detail – flow, as Pychyl calls it – is possible even when you aren’t under a time crunch. Learning how to voluntarily achieve a flow state requires time and effort but it’s the secret to productivity. Procrastinators, he says, need to realize that it is possible to concentrate without the motivation of deadline-induced panic. It just takes practice.

Minimize distractions and set strict deadlines.

If you have every distraction available at the push of a button, you’re more likely to check Facebook, check your emails, and suddenly three hours have gone by. Distractions, of course, decrease productivity for everyone, but for the chronic procrastinator, they’re real time-suckers. It’s better to eliminate as many of them as possible (be that blocking Facebook, deleting Solitaire off your desktop, whatever you have to do).

In addition, set a strict schedule for yourself. “Autonomy is good for non-procrastinators, put procrastinators need short, concrete deadlines,” Pychyl says. For managers dealing with procrastinating employees, Pychyl recommends having them articulate their goals in concrete terms. Specific details — rather than a vague “I’m working on X project – helps hold procrastinators accountable. “Have them make implementation intentions rather than goal intentions,” he recommends.

Don’t let your inner 6-year-old dictate your actions.

“I don’t know where we learn this, but somehow we internalize the notion that our motivational state has to match the task at hand,” says Pychyl. “We don’t feel like doing something, and we think that’s a reason!”

He calls this logic 6-year-old thinking. In reality, “For many of important tasks, if not most of them, getting started has nothing to do with how we feel.”

Still, we often dismiss the notion of getting started today with the perpetually hopeful “I’ll feel more like it tomorrow.” We almost never do, though, and so the task gets pushed off again. Why, then, do we persist in maintaining the delusion that a repellent task will be magically rendered less aversive in a mere 24 hours?

We tend to predict our future feelings based on present feelings, Pychyl explains. (Think about shopping for groceries on an empty stomach versus after you’ve just eaten a huge meal – most likely, your cart will be more crowded, even though rationally you know the week ahead requires the same amount of food). “When you decide to procrastinate, you relieve some stress which makes you feel good. So when you predict how you’re going to feel tomorrow, you base your prediction on your current mood.”

In addition, brain scans have shown that we tend to think about our future self as we would think about a stranger (known as temporal discounting), which explains why we often overestimate our ability/desire to accomplish an unappealing but necessary task three weeks from now.

The biggest myth that procrastinators need to dissolve if they want to break the delay cycle? “I’ll do it tomorrow,” says Pychyl. “Once you realize that this is an avoidant coping strategy, you’re on your way.”

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People often throw around the term business model in discussing startups.

But just what is a business model? Which ones work best and why? How do you know if your startup has the right one?

A business model explains which consumer pain your startup chooses to relieve, why your solution works better than competing ones and how big a wedge a company can drive between what customers are willing to pay and the costs.

I recently spent three hours with some clients, executives from Beijing, to discuss these questions: I presented several business models and their financial benefits.

After sharing the idea of the business model canvas, developed by Alexander Osterwalder to help entrepreneurs design a customized business model, I gave the Chinese executives an hour to “paint” a new business idea. (We did not use the interactive tool; they wrote their choices on a white board and addressed the class in Chinese. With the help of a translator, I asked follow-up questions.)

They did so brilliantly, picking two business ideas that clearly passed these three tests.

Read on for a quick review of the six most interesting business models I presented, some of which they found inspiring.

1. Hold a reverse auction. In a reverse auction, extremely price-sensitive buyers name their price for a service. If the seller accepts the price, the buyers must commit to the seller’s terms.

That’s the service that Priceline offers to desperate, price-sensitive travelers who give up convenience for the lowest price on accommodations, rental cars and airline tickets.

Priceline profits because plenty of consumers feel they are winning with their bid that’s just a tad higher than a price that would be too low for Priceline’s suppliers to accept.

And Priceline’s financial statistics reveal the greatness of this business model: 22 percent revenue growth, 50 percent profit growth and a 46 percent increase in stock price on average over the last decade. Priceline’s revenue per employee (it has 9,500) has been about $716,000, roughly six times the leisure industry’s average.

2. Orchestrate demand aggregation. Assemble all the sellers and buyers for some stuff in the same virtual location. This will give sellers the deepest pool of buyers and vice versa. That’s the idea behind eBay, of course, and it keeps working because buyers and sellers give each other very tough ratings and the use of PayPal provides a level of security in case things don’t work out.

The financial results for eBay indicate that this model works but it’s hardly a booming one. On average over the last decade, the company’s revenue grew 17 percent, profit climbed 14 percent, and the stock price rose a mere 5 percent. The company’s revenue per employee (with 33,500 in total) was about $479,000, roughly 40 percent more than the retail industry’s average.

3. Cut prices to gain an industry share and profit later. Target a huge market and sell a product at the lowest price with fast delivery and great service. As the company grows, expand the product line, negotiate volume discounts with suppliers, invest in technology to speed up customer-response time and cut waste from the operations. Then deliver the lower costs to customers in the form of lower prices.

That’s Amazon’s business model and it has let the company grow at a 27 percent annual rate over the last decade to $74 billion and its stock has risen on average 22 percent a year. While Amazon’s revenue is about $634,000 for each of its 117,300 employees, its net profit margin is a minuscule 0.37 percent.

4. Set up a modern franchise business. Figure out how to run a local retailer and turn this business wisdom into a system that can be sold to entrepreneurs around the world. Find hungry entrepreneurs who share this vision, sell them a business handbook, train them and let them handle the burden of finding new locations and leasing land.

That simple idea is what Ray Kroc turned into a gold mine of golden arches. Operating in 100 countries, McDonald’s has experienced just a 4 percent revenue growth over the last decade but its stock price has climbed 13 percent annually. Of the company’s $26 billion in sales, a considerable chunk, 20 percent, goes to the bottom line. The company is people intensive: Revenue per employee (with 440,000 in total) averages slightly less than $64,000.

5. Offer a product at the highest price. Find customers whose survival depends on a product that nobody else can provide. Then charge them half a million dollars a year to use it.

That’s what Alexion Pharmaceuticals does. In the U.S., 8,000 people have a disease that causes their immune systems to wipe out their red blood cells every night. Some of these people arrange for insurance companies or the U.S. government to pay $569,000 a year so they can take Alexion’s Soliris to stay alive.

It’s a great business model. In the last decade, Alexion’s stock has soared 2,250 percent a year and its revenues have spiked 106 percent annually to $1.6 billion, with 16 percent of that going to the bottom line. Its revenue per employee (with 1,774 employees in total) is on average more than $874,000.

6. Set up person-to-person exchanges. A company has a couple of cars that sit in the garage for all but three days a month. Some young professionals living in the city need a car seven days a week to commute and do errands. Find trustworthy people who will pay to drive those cars, and both sides will be better off.

That’s the idea behind person-to-person business models. It seems to be working for Airbnb. With 600,000 listings in 34,000 cities, Airbnb has people pay 3 percent to list their accommodations and the renters fork over 6 percent to 12 percent. With a quarter billion in revenue, Airbnb was recently valued at $10 billion.

Would one or a combination of these six ideas work for your startup?

Editor’s note: This piece has been updated to reflect the fact that Airbnb has listings in 34,000 cities not in 33,000 countries.

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Despite all the information out there about effective networking, business owners continue to commit blunders in their efforts to get face-to-face with potential clients.

Entrepreneurs can be guilty of thinking of themselves first and the people they can potentially serve second. As the saying goes, “It’s not who you know but who wants to know you” that really counts.

Here are three serious mistakes to avoid:

1. Not making eye contact. The first common networking sin is constantly looking over the other person’s shoulder when you are having a conversation. This silently communicates to the person you are talking to that they are unimportant. Instead, focus intently. When you feel it’s time to move around the room and mingle with others, simply excuse yourself.

2. Forgetting the name of the person you have just met. This sets you up for embarrassment when someone else you know comes over and joins you, expecting to be introduced to the person with whom you are speaking.

Make it a point to remember the names of people that you meet. If you miss or forget them, excuse yourself and ask them to repeat it.

Motivational speaker and author Dale Carnegie was right when he said, “The sweetest, most important sound in any language is to that person the sound of his or her own name.” When you remember and use the name of the person you have met in your conversation with them, you will go a long way in building an effective relationship.

3. Showing up late or leaving early. This third and final deadly sin of networking gives the impression of someone who does not know how to plan their time.

People who do this always seem to be in a hurry and come across as pushy and only interested in talking about themselves — shoving one of their business cards into your hand before rushing off to meet somebody else.

My recommendation here is to schedule accordingly and spend quality time at the networking event in which you are investing your reputation and time.

The 3 Deadly Sins of Networking

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